I ran across this word "WRAY" quite on purpose.

Of course, I did not literally run across this word, since it is not a physical entity until I (or someone else) writes it.

But then, it is only a series of letters, generated by electrical impulses in our brain,

and how the brain does that is still under investigation.

Anyway, I liked the letter combinations available: WAY, RAY, or just WRAY,

which does show up in various dictionaries defined as:


"Wray (v.t.) To reveal, to disclose."
(http://www.mso.anu.edu.au/~ralph/OPTED)


Wray is a very intelligent, sweet, nice, joker guy.
He is always there for you no matter what.
He does not judge people.
He holds his head up high and has made it through some of life’s toughest battles.
If he can make it through that he can make it through anything!
(http://www.urbandictionary.com)   
And various others also.


Considering the definitions of this rather antiquated word, let’s add our own observation:
A WRAY is a Way with a Ray; or a way that has been or is illuminated.


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My father once told my mother that, “Roy has his way of doing everything.” I took that as a compliment (scrawny little kid needed all the encouragement he could conjure up). But then, don’t we all have our own wrays? This is just a play on words, isn’t it? But, when we seriously consider what we think we know about life, it is all a play with words. One could say that commonly perceived consciousness is nothing but the ability to play with words in our heads. After all,

“When nothing has been said,
Nothing’s left unsaid:
Words are only traps
To keep us in our heads."
(From “QUESTIONS”, Roy Brittain)

Let’s always remember that words, and the images associated with our perception of them, exist only in our heads. This is a major problem with human communication: every word has a different definition/connotation associated with it based strictly upon the experiences/memories of each and every individual. A word may be perceived only as an unidentified sound by one person, but, may extract violent reactions from another. Perhaps this is why what we do is more important than what we say. What we do speaks a totally different language.
“If you smile at me I will understand,
for that is something everybody does
in the same language.”
(Crosby, Stills & Nash)

Knowing we cannot retract anything spoken, we still say almost anything.